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Old 09-01-2006, 06:36 PM
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Default Soy Paper

Any one know where I can buy some soy paper in s.f.v. or L.A. area I really need some this weekend I have found it on line but thats to late. I tried the local Asain market no luck. Sushi resturants are reluctant to sell it.
any leads Terry
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Old 09-02-2006, 09:48 AM
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Soy paper? What is that? Are you talking about Nori? If it is nori, then try mitsuwa in West Los Angeles on Centinella and Venice. Also Marukai on Redondo Beach Blvd in Gardena. It's at Denker.
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Old 09-02-2006, 10:11 AM
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Terry, the nearest place that I know is the oriental market on the SW corner of Desoto and Roscoe. There's also a Korean oriented one on the SE corner of White Oak and Sherman Way. I don't know if either of them carry it though.

Mel, what I think he is refering to is a white, pliable wrapper used instead of nori to wrap rolls, I think its make of sheets of a tofu like concoction. It doesn't have a lot of flavor and no crunch at all.
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Old 09-02-2006, 10:14 AM
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Default More Places.

There's also a Ranch 99 on Sepulvada at Victory, near Bob Sands . If you're desrious enough to go over the hill, there's also a few Japanese groceries on Sawtelle between Santa Monica and Olympic.
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Old 09-02-2006, 10:29 AM
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Soy paper is a seaweed substitute offered in sushi bars usually for an extra buck My wife had it once when a friend of hers turned her on to it and now thats all she'll eat I'm making her spicy tuna roll's tonite I'm gonna try mitsuwa today Brad I already tried the local spots Thanks note: Wife just called Mitsawa and they have it Guys try it next time at the sushi bar it's really good Terry
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Old 09-05-2006, 05:09 PM
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Terry, I think what you are referring to is "yuba".

=> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuba_(food)

Yuba (food)

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Yuba (湯葉, ゆば?) or tofu skin (Chinese: 腐皮; pinyin: fǔ p) is a Japanese and Chinese food product made from soybeans. During the boiling of soy milk, in an open shallow pan, a film or skin composed primarily of a soy protein-lipid complex forms on the liquid surface. The films are collected and dried into yellowish sheets known as tofu skin or soy milk skin.
Yuba may be purchased in fresh or dried form, in the latter case, the yuba is rehydrated in water before use. It is often used to wrap dim sum.
Due to it slightly rubbery texture, yuba is also manufactured in bunched, folded and wrapped forms that are used as meat substitutes in vegetarian cuisine. Yuba skins can be wrapped and then folded against itself to make do baō (Chinese: 豆包, lit. tofu package). These are often fried to give it a firmer skin before being cooked further.
Yuba skin may also be bunched into sticks called dried bean curd stick (Chinese: 腐竹; pinyin: fǔ zh). By bunching fresh yuba or rehydrated bean curd sticks, then tying it tightly in cloth and stewing it, the bunched yuba will retain its tied shape. This bunched yuba is then called tofu chicken (Traditional Chinese: 豆雞; pinyin: do jī; or Traditional Chinese: 素雞; pinyin: s jī). If the maker of tofu chicken layers and bunches the tofu skins in a certain manner, they can imitate a piece of chicken breast with the skin on. The effect is completed by frying the "skin" side of the tofu chicken till it's crispy.
Other methods include rolling the yuba tightly on a chopstick and steaming the yuba to form a log. When the log is sliced, each slice will be circular in form with a square hole in the center, which looks like old chinese coins.

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In some of the upscale Japanese restaurants, they will have a dish where you make your own Yuba. Soy milk comes in a shallow pan, with a burner. As the solid film forms on top, you gently pick it up, dip it in sauce and enjoy.
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